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Project Summary - Donnells & Beardsley

(FERC No. 2005)

The Beardsley/Donnells project, built primarily for water storage in the 1950s, is jointly owned and operated by the Oakdale and South San Joaquin Irrigation Districts under the Tri-Dam Project formed in 1948. Beardsley/Donnells is a 83 MW project on the Middle Fork of the Stanislaus river in Tuolumne county, central California. It occupies 790 acres in the Stanislaus National Forest. The Donnells project includes a dam, reservoir, tunnel and penstock, and a 72 MW powerhouse. Downstream is Beardsley, with a dam, reservoir, 11 MW powerhouse and an afterbay dam. The project can store 160,000 acre-feet and generates an annual average of 369 million KWh. All of the power is sold to PG&E. There are eight FERC-licensed water projects in the watershed. Among them are Tri-Dam's 18 MW Tulloch project (2067) and PG&E's Spring Gap-Stanislaus (2130), which are operated in coordination with Beardsley/Donnells, as well as a PG&E transmission line. Tulloch generates 93 million KWh annually; Spring Gap-Stanislaus, 427 million KWh. The licenses for Tulloch, Spring Gap-Stanislaus, Beardsley/Donnells and the transmission line all expire at end of 2004. Under a 1996 agreement, Tri-Dam and PG&E saved study costs by coordinating their relicensing efforts. They used a hybrid of the traditional and alternative licensing processes. Both filed separate final applications in December 2002 for their respective projects, seeking 50-year terms. On March 1, 2004 the companies sent FERC an agreement detailing projected PME measures and signed by a number of state, federal and non-governmental entities (See item [2/11]).

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